Beat-Herder 2018 Review

Our first visit to Beat-herder left us feeling complete and fulfilled, both musically and spiritually! The even is billed as an “orgy of beats and barminess” – and that’s a pretty accurate description!

Located near Clitheroe in the Ribble Valley, the festival was full of surprises. The organisers had put a lot of creative energy into an array of 20+ whimsical stages which varied from castles and mansions to forests and factories. Beat-Herder’s magic lies in its special little touches designed to make your festival experience top notch. The attention to detail given to every aspect leaves you in no uncertainty that this is a festival for the people! From great music and fantastic stages to decent priced beer and its beautiful location – this isn’t a commercial festival, just thrown together to make as much money as possible.

IMG_4566.jpg

The music was just a small part of the experience at Beat-Herder. Entirely handmade from scratch, the stages stood out as something truly different in the increasingly identikit festival landscape. That attention to detail creates an immersive world full of beguiling and intriguing creative concepts. Which other festivals give you the opportunity to explore underground tunnels, dance to drum and bass in a chapel or get inked in the functioning tattoo parlour? And when the hedonism got a little too much, you could slow the pace by lounging in the heated hidden swimming pool or by enjoying some retro entertainment at the site’s very own working men’s club.

IMG_4516.jpg

Beat-Herder’s picturesque site and technicolour utopia are truly unique but the line-up wasn’t something to be sniffed at either as it featured a range of great acts such as Orbital, Django Django, PINS, David Rodigan, Patrick Topping, Soulwax, Ibibio Sound Machine, Foals DJ set and more.

IMG_4650.jpg

Over its twelve-year history, Beat-Herder has become known for uniting the disparate subcultures of dance music in one phenomenal location in the Ribble Valley.

Beat-Herder was true to its word and was one of the weirdest, wildest and most wonderful festivals that we have been to.

IMG_4650.jpg

One of the highlights of the visit was Toil Trees on the Saturday night, which featured BBC Radio 1’s Pete Tong. Spanning a two decade long career, the icon of dance music brought an experienced presence to the Toil Trees stage, the beating heart of the festival.

Beat-Herder continues to exist as it did back when it started as a free DIY party in 1998: uncompromising, unwavering and distinguished by an overwhelming sense of community. Its reputation as one of the friendliest festivals around can be attributed to its loyal followers – friends, couples and families who create new memories to cherish in a bold and barmy atmosphere each summer.

For more information visit: beatherder.co.uk

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s